Juvenile Choices

What you fail to learn at home you can get in Juvenile Justice—sometimes that means a new perspective through a little community service, or an outlook from behind bars. “I wasn’t doing anything…” those are often the first words of a juvenile defendant…and nothing good comes after that when the story is told in court.  “We were just hanging out…” then the trouble begins. “You may outgrow your responsibility to listen to your parents, but you will never outgrow your responsibility to obey the law.  The best way to remain in charge of your own life is to know the law, and obey it. Do otherwise, and you are responsible for putting someone that you do not even know in charge of telling you everything from where you can go and what you can do, all the way down to what you can wear, and what you can eat.”  – Judge Alexander and Judge Wolfe The Juvenile Justice System will feed you, but it is harder to order pizza from a jail cell.  If you do not make a choice, decisions can get made for you, and the consequences may not be what you wanted. Read More

DUI & A Fine Labor Day

Some bars are better than others.  The best kind of bars are the ones where you can leave of your own freewill in a taxi. A DUI (Driving Under the Influence) involves a Fine and Labor.  For first offenders, it is a $500 minimum fine and at least 50 hours of community service (which can be translated into a dollar amount in some cases), plus an arrest record and other details.  And that is just for the first timers.  For more details on Florida DUI and Administrative Suspension Laws, go to http://www.flhsmv.gov/ddl/duilaws.html. Have a safe and happy Labor Day! Read More

Teen Scene & Commitment

Even if you are under age 18, a felony charge can result in more than one year in a commitment facility…that might not be the kind of commitment you are looking for. “You may outgrow your responsibility to listen to your parents, but you will never outgrow your responsibility to obey the law.”  That is a quote from Judge Alexander and Judge Wolfe.  They go on to point out, “The best way to remain in charge of your own life is to know the law, and obey it.  Do otherwise, and you are responsible for putting someone that you do not even know in charge of telling you everything from where you can go and what you can do, all the way down to what you can wear, and what you can eat.” You do not have to live with your parents.  Juvenile Justice will feed you.  You can get into bars, but getting out may take some time and community service.  Be mindful of what you make a commitment to. Read More