Judicial Branch on the Ballot

Tired of the party?  Look at judicial elections:  it is illegal for a political party or partisan political organization to endorse, support or assist any candidate in a campaign for election to judicial office. Judicial elections are non-partisan, meaning the candidates are on the ballot without reference to political party.  Furthermore, appeals court judges and Florida Supreme Court Justices do not run against opponents or each other.  The voting public gets to decide if they stay or not through merit retention elections. Not all districts in Florida have judges up for merit retention; however, every Florida voter will get to decide on keeping three Florida Supreme Court Justices. For more information on judicial candidates and their backgrounds visit the Florida Bar website at www.FloridaBar.org/TheVotesInYourCourt and www.FloridaBar.org/JudicialCandidates. Remember to vote on Tuesday, November 6 (if you have not already).   Read More

Judicial Appointment

Tired of partisan politics?  Revel in judicial appointment.  Appeals Court Judges, like Judge Berger, get onto district benches via gubernatorial appointment.  While Judge Berger did not have to win a public election to get there, she will have to go before voters within two years for merit retention, and every six years thereafter to remain. Congratulations to Judge Berger on her appointment to the Fifth District Court of Appeals. Read More

The Vote Is In Your Court – Judicial Elections

Your voter’s registration is good for more than just jury duty.  It enables you to help determine who sits on the bench.  There are fifteen Appeals Court Judges and three Florida Supreme Court Justices coming up for merit retention…where the vote is in your court. Appeals Court Judges get into office via gubernatorial appointment; however, they have to go through periodic merit retention with the voters to remain on the bench.  Four Appeals Court Judges are on the 2012 ballot in the First District Court of Appeals, which covers Duval, Nassau, and Clay Counties. There are no Appeals Court Judges from the Fifth District Court of Appeals (DCA) due for merit retention.  That means St. Johns, Flagler, and Putnam Counties (among others) only have to be concerned with the three Florida Supreme Court Justices due for statewide majority appeal or rejection. So who are these judicial merit people on the ballot?  It is illegal for a political party or partisan political organization to endorse, support or assist any candidate in a campaign for election to judicial office; however, the Florida Bar has a campaign to educate Florida voters.  Go to www.FloridaBar.org/TheVotesInYourCourt for candidate profiles and to find out more about […] Read More